Eclectic rock solo outfit HUMANS ETCETERA – the creation of one Christopher Henry – will release a newly-completed EP, Gift That Came Here, in late November through Nefarious Industries. The proceeds from the EP will be donated to Marine Toys For Tots, which distributes gifts to less fortunate children. To help spread the news, PureGrainAudio has debuted the EP’s first single, through a premiere of the song “Eavesdropper,” as preorders for the benefit release are posted.
Gift That Came Here will see release thirteen months after HUMANS ETCETERA‘s Intelligent Skeleton EP, and sees creator Christopher Henry delivering six varied, instrumental, experimental post-rock songs. While wholly ukulele-driven, the soloist also plays guitar, bass, drums, and synths, and handled all other sampling, mixing, mastering, artwork, and videos for the release. Beyond its sound, Gift That Came Here was created with a heartfelt message and goal in mind.
Christopher Henry reveals, “I’m hoping to use this release to rake in a nice chunk of coin for Marine Toys for Tots. I vividly recall being twelve years old and getting nothing for Christmas. My Santa (my grandpa) had a stroke that summer and passed away. I hadn’t realized that my grandpa alone had been responsible for bringing Christmas gifts to my brother and I, and I also couldn’t understand why my own parents didn’t manage their money well enough for that. I remember just not being able to explain it to my classmates when they inevitably asked me, ‘So what did you get for this Christmas?'”
“This EP will be used to raise money for the Marine Toys For Tots Foundation. All the funds raised will be donated directly. My hope is that by playing the ukulele, a gift that immigrants brought to Hawaii, it will in-turn help bring more gifts to some less fortunate children this winter. I hope Gift That Came Here might help you on a long and lonely day too. Perhaps you can even vicariously experience what it was like to compose it. I mean, you could do a lot worse with your time.”
The song “Eavesdropper” has been released through a video which has been premiered through PureGrainAudio, who issues, “HUMANS ETCETERA may sound like a full band, but it’s actually not! We are happy to bring you the exclusive premiere of the music video for ‘Eavesdropper,’ from multi-instrumentalist Christopher Henry.”
See HUMANS ETCETERA’s “Eavesdropper” via PureGrainAudio RIGHT HERE.
Gift That Came Here will see release on November 30th, and 100% of the proceeds will be donated to Marine Toys For Tots, delivering gifts to children whose parents cannot afford to buy them gifts for Christmas. Additionally, the artist is raffling off the ukulele used on the record; every purchase will count as an entry into the contest, and the winner will be announced on the EP’s release date.
Preorders have been posted at the Nefarious Industries webstore HERE and Bandcamp HERE.
Gift That Came Here Track Listing:
1. Eavesdropper
2. Wandering
3. Always Aging Away
4. Hold On
5. Public Square Private Thoughts
6. Stoned Goodbyes
Melding ’90s alternative rock and post-hardcore with indie, world, experimental, and modern rock elements, HUMANS ETCETERA is an experimental rock outfit founded by West Virginia native, Christopher Henry (Fuck Your Birthday, Polyphozia, ex-Clean Dirty Clean), who now resides in China for the past several years. The transformation has helped shift his musical views into new directions, creating HUMANS ETCETERA to be the conduit in expressing these sounds.
Henry elaborates on the EP’s foundation: “I got this ukulele in the winter of 2017 to help with teaching a Chinese ESL student. He was preparing for a summer abroad at Berklee and needed to learn the basics of music theory in English. In my spare time at work though, the uke was there to accompany me. I messed around with it and recorded a bunch of little things. These demos were the seeds from which these songs grew.
“However, the concept of this EP wasn’t realized until I got bored one afternoon and decided to wiki the ukulele,” he continues. “I read about Madeiran workers in Hawaii developing a uke in 1879. And I stumbled upon a sweet quote taken from the memoirs of Liliʻuokalani. She was a writer, a musician, as well as the last sovereign monarch of the Kingdom of Hawaiʻi and consequentially imprisoned when the kingdom had fallen. She wrote: ‘To compose was as natural to me as to breathe; and this gift of nature, never having been suffered to fall into disuse, remains a source of the greatest consolation to this day… Hours of which it is not yet in place to speak, which I might have found long and lonely, passed quickly and cheerfully by, occupied and soothed by the expression of my thoughts in music.’ I really related to that.