In this day and age, if you’re yet to be familiar with the political powerhouse that is Fever 333, I’m sorry to point out that you’ve been living under a rock. The rising supergroup founded by vocalist Jason Aalon Butler, previously from Letlive., guitarist Stephen Harrison from The Chariot and drummer Aric Improta from Night Verses has been taking the rock scene with such a relentless fury that’s yet to be topped; from beginning in the parking lot of a Randy’s Donuts in 2017, to supporting the almighty Bring Me The Horizon on their EU arena tour, and now to performing at the inaugural Download Festival in Australia alongside Ozzy Osbourne, Ghost, Judas Priest and Behemoth, to say the least.

Jason Aalon Butler is undeniably one of the most unique musicians on the planet at the moment, and it shows throughout his entire career. His career in Letlive. (RIP) brushed on everything from family issues, to political issues that plague not just America, but the world; now with Fever 333, he’s taken his political ideologies to new heights, creating a ripple in the music scene as we know it. Now, as he prepares to come down for Download Festival with Fever 333, the idea of coming down to Australia for the first time since 2017 has him incredibly ecstatic.

“That last tour specifically I got to see my wife’s best friend and her husband who actually live in Melbourne, such amazing people, and it really reflects on the Australian culture,” reminiscing on his time spent down under. “I love Melbourne and Australia, ultimately the investment in Australian music culture is very unique and I feel like when I’m there, you’re instantly a part of it, you’re instantly indoctrinated and that’s important to me, especially for an artist to feel so welcome.”

It’s not just the culture and the scene that Butler’s excited to be a part of and perform to, but to finally be a fan and enjoy his favourite bands. “I’m most looking forward to being a music fan at the festival and then being able to share the stage with people I’ve looked up to for decades,” further explaining how excited he is share the stage with the great Ozzy. “It’s crazy to have grown up with bands on MTV and the radio, and now to share the stage with these bands is surreal. I mean like, Crazy Train man.”

The comparison between Letlive. And 333 is severely evident; whilst still melodic, 333’s drive for social change, artistic integrity and ideologies are much more open and freer. “There’s even less parameters for me to create within, I’ve become more comfortable, better at my craft, more direct, more distinct in what I want to achieve and how I want to achieve it.” Butler develops on his comfortability a bit more, stating “I think it’s becoming more comfortable with time and also my experiences, everything you pick up along the way, even less restrictions or expanding the capacity on what I think is possible.”

Experiences shape who you are, and if you’re an artist, you’ll understand that it affects the way you view your own, and other art. “I think it’s a pretty multidimensional project. In our own personal life too, we learn who we are as individuals, like I’m the only father in the band, my wife is from New Zealand, and that’s shaped me into who I am. I just feel we bring a lot of complexity to the project, but a lot of it was intentional.”

333 have demonstrated with their new album, along with their drive for change has pushed them onto the top of the podium for political punk and guitar-based music. “The multiple layers we offer as a project would be what we hoped to be. The music, the messaging, the charity foundation – we also have events aligned with the charity – and the activism.”

One thing 333 have mentioned on social media and through demonstrations is their desire to bring people together and create positive, thoughtful change. “Ultimately, the overarching thing is power, it’s helping recognize that power they hold within themselves, offering representation to people that felt underrepresented. That really lies in the power that we forget; that we’ve had taken from us systemically by way of social engineering, subjugation, by way of life. These are systems that are put in place that leverage power, really keeping us in a position where we have to almost beg for it.”

When it comes to 333’s message and final goal, Butler was incredibly explicit. “The goal is power, and letting people know that we see the power within them. We see it, we encourage it, we’d like to offer assistance with it. We’re not speaking for anyone; we’re speaking with them. The endgame is to create a culture which can seem like a delusion of grandeur, but I believe we can create a culture that’s more empathetic, more understanding, discourse encouraged, where you don’t have to feel afraid when you’re challenged, putting an effort into progression. That’s the culture we’d like to create.”

The concept behind the 3 is also one that holds a much deeper meaning behind the band’s message and goal. ‘Strength In Numb333rs’ contains 3 sister tracks; Prey For Me/3, Inglewood/3 and Out Of Control/3, and Butler delves into the conceptuality behind it all. “That was a creative way to put the 3 into the album itself. It helps to honor the idea of everything in 3, solidarity and strength of the number. The track’s supposed to provide results of/answers to what I’m asking for or what I’m exhibiting of the first half of the track, with the second half it gives you the aftermath, another layer of how I’ve felt or observed these issues.”

The style behind 333’s writing helps develop on the issues at hand painfully well, pushing boundaries in music genre’s as well as adding their own little spin on their artistry. “Honestly, I wanted to offer guitar-based music another way to receive music you know? They do it in hip hop, indie music, I wanted to introduce a more eclectic way to present these songs.”



One of the most intriguing tracks on ‘Strength in Numb333rs’ that 333 have demonstrated is the third track, Animal. One of the biggest reasons for this is that the track resembles a much more politically driven Linkin Park, especially Butler’s performance being eerily similar to Chester Bennington.

Honestly, I fuck with Linkin Park but I’ve never in my life modelled my voice after Chester. I thought that he was so unique in his own right, that should be his lane, but I’ve been hearing a lot of comparisons, and by no means am I offended by it. That man did something very unique for guitar-based music and I can’t honestly say that I made a conscious decision to do it. But I don’t shy away from it. It’s really quite cool that I can be compared to him.

“Honestly, I fuck with Linkin Park but I’ve never in my life modelled my voice after Chester. I thought that he was so unique in his own right, that should be his lane, but I’ve been hearing a lot of comparisons, and by no means am I offended by it. That man did something very unique for guitar-based music and I can’t honestly say that I made a conscious decision to do it. But I don’t shy away from it. It’s really quite cool that I can be compared to him.

On behalf of Fever 333, Jason Aalon Butler left the Australian fans with one message, and one message only:

There’s a motherfucking fever coming.

Preorder ‘Strength in Numb333rs’ HERE
Catch the Fever at Download Festival with tickets in Sydney HERE and in Melbourne HERE