CJ Ramone, fresh from headlining this year’s annual Joey Ramone Birthday Bash, takes the baseball bat to Australian venues this September!

One of the last few surviving punk rockers blessed with famous Ramones sobriquet (and the only who wasn’t behind the drumkit), CJ is bringing his killer band of cretins for a guitar crushing session of psychotherapy!

Make no mistake, you are NEVER going to hear the Ramones songs done better than CJ RAMONE does them. If you missed the Ramones – or just miss them – this is the show you need to see.

I Wanna Be Sedated/ Judy Is A Punk/ Rockaway Beach/ Sheena Is A Punk Rocker/ I Wanna Be Your Boyfriend/The KKK Took My Baby Away/ Baby I Love You/ California Sun/ Cretin Family/ Psycho Therapy/R.A.M.O.N.E.S./ The Crusher/ Glad To See You Go / Blitzkreig Bop

Presale: 10am  Monday June 3rd 
General on sale: 10am Tuesday June 4th 
via DavidRoyWilliams.com

Wed Sept 11 – Edgehill Tavern, Cairns
Thurs Sept 12 – Coolangatta Hotel, Gold Coast
Fri Sept 13 – The Zoo, Brisbane
Sat Sept 14 – Croxton Bandroom, Melbourne
Sun Sept 15 – Barwon Club, Geelong
Wed Sept 18 – The Basement, Canberra
Thurs Sept 19 – Factory Theatre, Sydney
Fri Sept 20 – Small Ballroom, Newcastle
Sat Sept 21 – Narrabeen Hotel, Narrabeen
Wed Sept 25 – Karova Lounge, Ballarat
Thurs Sept 26 – Lion Arts, Adelaide
Fri Sept 27 – Bar 1 Nightclub, Hillary
Sat Sept 28
 – Prince Of Wales, Bunbury
Sun Sept 29 – The Rosemount, Perth

The Ramones – like AC/DC, like Motorhead – are true and singular rock icons; a band whose music became its own genre; a band who influenced every other band who ever smoked an amp in their wake. And in the Ramones’ case it wasn’t just subsequent punk bands from The Sex Pistols to The Buzzcocks to The Misfits to Bad Religion to Green Day to The Living End – it was also hard rock / Metal bands. Metallica, Guns ‘N’ Roses, Pearl Jam, even KISS – they all love the Ramones, and were influenced by their energy, economy and simplicity. It’s no surprise that Epitaph Records tried desperately to sign the band following the success of The Offspring in the early 90s, just as it’s no surprise that the Ramones’ iconic logo has become one of the most ubiquitous designs in street wear and fashion over the last decade. 

CJ Ramone wasn’t an original member – sadly, none of the originally four are still alive – but replaced Dee Dee Ramone as the bass thumping heart and soul of the Ramones. 23-year-old CJ rose to the occasion, never letting Dee Dee’s 1-2-3-4 energy flag for a moment and bringing never-say-die enthusiasm to the band when it needed it most. The late and great Tommy Ramone meant it when he thanked CJ for “keeping the band young” at the Ramones’ Rock’n’roll Hall of Fame induction in 2002. CJ was with The Ramones (and post Ramones band The Ramainz featuring Dee Dee and Marky) for a decade and played on the band’s final three studio albums, ‘Mondo Bizarro,’ ‘Acid Eaters’ and ‘Adios Amigos.’ His presence is clearly felt and heard on all three via his powering bass, a handful of lead vocals on each, and original tunes. CJ also appeared on the live albums ‘Loco Live,’ ‘Greatest Hits Live’ and ‘We’re Outta Here’ where he can be heard singing Dee Dee’s songs.

CJ Ramone released his first solo album in 2012 and signed to legendary West Coast punk label Fat Wreck Chords in 2013. His first two albums for the label, ‘Last Chance to Dance’ and ‘American Beauty,’ included backing from members of The Adolescents and Social Distortion. His just released third Fat album, ‘The Holy Spell,’ includes a heartfelt tribute to his late friend and collaborator, Adolescents founder Steve Soto. The title of the new album tells of CJ’s ongoing love affair with punk rock: “I never lost that magical feeling that you get from music, and that’s where the title came in,” he says. “The bands that I listened to when I was young that I really enjoyed, I can still put that music on now, and it still has the same magic for me.” 

CJ Ramone’s solo albums keep the Ramones flame alive and have been universally acclaimed for their power and quality. CJ is a fine singer and songwriter, and knowing the Ramones music from the inside, he is able to bring that sound and spirit to his own work. He also taps into the SoCal punk-pop sound that the likes of which Fat label mates such as NOFX, No Use for a Name and The Descendents are famous for, and which the Ramones inspired in the first place.